Mug Shot — «Cluj Napoca - Lucian Blaga National Theatre»

From Cluj Napoca, Romania

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Starbucks City Mug Cluj Napoca - Lucian Blaga National Theatre
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Cluj-Napoca, commonly known as Cluj, is the second most populous city in Romania, behind the national capital Bucharest, and is the seat of Cluj County in the northwestern part of the country. Located in the Someşul Mic River valley, the city is considered the unofficial capital to the historical province of Transylvania. Between 1790 and 1848 and between 1861 and 1867, it was the official capital of the Grand Principality of Transylvania. The city spreads out from St. Michael's Church in Unirii Square, built in the 14th century and named after the Archangel Michael, the patron saint of Cluj-Napoca. The boundaries of the municipality contain an area of 179.52 square kilometres. Cluj-Napoca experienced a decade of decline during the 1990s, its international reputation suffering from the policies of its mayor of the time, Gheorghe Funar. Today, the city is one of the most important academic, cultural, industrial and business centres in Romania. Among other institutions, it hosts the country's largest university, Babeş-Bolyai University, with its famous botanical garden; nationally renowned cultural institutions; as well as the largest Romanian-owned commercial bank. According to the American magazine InformationWeek, Cluj-Napoca is quickly becoming Romania's technopolis.

The Lucian Blaga National Theatre in Cluj-Napoca, Romania is one of the most prestigious theatrical institutions in Romania. The theatre shares the same building with the Romanian Opera. The theatre was built between 1904 and 1906 by the famous Austrian architects Ferdinand Fellner and Hermann Helmer who designed several theatres and palaces across Europe in the late 19th century and early 20th century, including the theatres in Iaşi, Oradea, Timişoara and Chernivtsi. The project was financed using only private capital. The theatre opened on 8 September 1906 with Ferenc Herczeg's Bujdosók and until 1919, as Cluj was part of the Kingdom of Hungary, it was home to the local Hungarian National Theatre. The last performance of the Hungarian troupe was held on September 30, 1919 and presented Shakespeare's Hamlet. Since 1919, the building has been home to the local Romanian National Theatre and Romanian Opera, while the local Hungarian Theatre and Opera received the theatre building in Emil Isac street, close to the Central Park and Someşul Mic River. After the Second Vienna Award the building was again the home of the Hungarian Theatre. On 31 October 1944 the Romanian and Hungarian actors celebrating the freedom of the city held a common performance, the revenue being donated to the Russian and Romanian wounded soldiers. The hall has a capacity of 928 places, being conceived in the Neo-baroque style, with some inflexions inspired by the Secessionism in the decoration of the foyer.

photo by lucky
edited by mobydick74

  Romania, Cluj Napoca, 08 Icon Edition, MIC

Karma: 5 Added by Lucky 2 Comments

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